Momentum

Momentum is the tendency of investments to persist in their performance. Assets that perform well over a 3 to 12 month period tend to continue to perform well into the future. The momentum effect of Jegadeesh and Titman (1993) is one of the strongest and most pervasive financial phenomena. Momentum investment strategies have been mostly applied to equities (see momentum in equities), however there is large evidence documenting momentum across different asset classes. Typical strategy consists of a universe of major indices on equity, bonds, real estate and commodities. The aim is to keep long only portfolio where an index with positive past 12 month returns is bought and negative returns sold. A well-known example of trend following momentum strategy is from Faber (2007). He creates 10 month moving average for which assets are sold and bought every month based on price being above or below the moving average. Using a 100 years of data, Faber claims to outperform the market with the mean return of 10.18% , 11.97 % volatility and max draw-down of 50.29%, compared to S&P 500 return of 9.32%, volatility of 17.87% and max draw-down of 83.46%.

In general, we distinguish between absolute and relative momentum. Absolute momentum is captured by trend following strategies that adjusts weights of assets based on past returns such as relative level of current prices compared to moving averages. Relative or cross sectional momentum, on the other hand, use long and short positions applied to both the long and short side of a market simultaneously. It makes little difference whether the studied markets go up or down, since short momentum positions hedge long ones, and vice versa. When looking only at long side momentum, however, it is desirable to be long only when both absolute and relative momentum are positive, since long-only momentum results are highly regime dependent. In order to increase performance, the simple momentum strategy is expanded to capture both relative and absolute momentum creating a long short portfolio.

Various extensions to the simple strategies shown above have been suggested. For example we can deploy mean-variance optimisation to re-weight our assets to minimise the risk given return. Moreover, we can diversify the strategy by restricting the weights to different asset classes and risk factors as well as adding various risk management practices to decrease leverage during heightened volatility periods. Furthermore, taking into account the cyclicality and idiosyncratic momentum of various sub-indices to Faber’s original asset classes produces even stronger improvements to risk-adjusted returns. Unfortunately, cross-sectional strategies use high number of stocks resulting in high trading costs. Luckily, it has been found that using sectors and indices instead of individual stocks still earns similar momentum returns while having lower trading costs.

Numerous empirical studies report on benefits of extending momentum strategy across asset classes (see Rouwenhorst 1998, Blake 1999, Griffin, Ji, and Martin 2003, Gorton, Hayashi, and Rouwenhorst 2008, Asness, Moskowitz, and Pedersen 2009). For example, including commodities in a momentum strategy can achieve better diversification and protection from inflation while having equity like returns (Erb and Harvey, 2006). Foreign exchange is another asset class with published momentum effects. Okunev and White (2003) find the well-documented profitability of momentum strategies with equities to hold for currencies throughout the 1980s and the 1990s. Contrary to already mentioned asset classes, bond returns have generally not displayed momentum. However, some later evidence suggests that assorting bonds with volatility adjusted returns leads to observation of momentum. Using 68,914 individual investment-grade and high-yield bonds, Jostova et al. (2013) find strong evidence of momentum profitability in US corporate bonds over the period from 1973 to 2008. Past six-month winners outperform past six-month losers by 61 basis points per month over a six-month holding period. Last but not least, momentum has been documented in real estate with a cross-sectional momentum buy/sell strategy significantly reducing volatility and drawdown of a long only REIT fund.

An often cited benefit of momentum strategies is their sustainable performance attributed to a true anomaly rather than skewedness in the return probability distribution that is cited to be responsible for value and carry strategy. Reasons explaining the momentum anomaly include analyst coverage, analyst forecast dispersion, illiquidity, price level, age, size, credit rating, return chasing and confirmation bias, market-to-book, turnover and others.

Equity Momentum in Years 1820-1930

10.June 2019

Once again, our favorite type of study – an out of sample research study based on data from 19th and beginning of 20th century.  Interesting research paper related to all equity momentum strategies …

Authors: Trigilia, Wang

Title: Momentum, Echo and Predictability: Evidence from the London Stock Exchange (1820-1930)

Link: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3373164

Abstract:

We study momentum and its predictability within equities listed at the London Stock Exchange (1820-1930). At the time, this was the largest and most liquid stock market and it was thinly regulated, making for a good laboratory to perform out-of-sample tests. Cross-sectionally, we find that the size and market factors are highly profitable, while long-term reversals are not. Momentum is the most profitable and volatile factor. Its returns resemble an echo: they are high in long-term formation portfolios, and vanish in short-term ones. We uncover momentum in dividends as well. When controlling for dividend momentum, price momentum loses significance and profitability. In the time-series, despite the presence of a few momentum crashes, dynamically hedged portfolios do not improve the performance of static momentum. We conclude that momentum returns are not predictable in our sample, which casts some doubt on the success of dynamic hedging strategies.

Notable quotations from the academic research paper:

"This paper studies momentum and its predictability in the context of the rst modern stock market, the London Stock Exchange (LSE), from the 1820s to the 1920s.

Factors' performance. Compared to the U.S. post-1926, we find that the market has been less profi table – averaging 5% annually (but also less volatile). Its Sharpe ratio has been 0.34, not too far from the 0.43 of CRSP. The Small-Minus-Big (SMB) factor delivered a 4.85% average annual return, much higher than that found in U.S. post-1926. The risk-free rate, as proxied by the interest on British Government's consols, has been close to 3.3% throughout the period, despite the many large changes in supply (i.e., in the outstanding stock of public debt). As for momentum (UMD), consistent with the existing evidence it has been the most profi table factor – with an average annual return close to 9% – and the most volatile – with 20% annual standard deviation.

Momentum in years 1820-1930

Dissecting momentum returns. Recent literature debates whether momentum is long or short term. In our sample, UMD profi ts strongly depend on the formation period: they average at 10.6% annually for long-term formation (12 to 7 months) and 3.8% for short-term formation (6 to 2 months). So, our out-of-sample test confi rms that momentum is better described as a within-year echo.

To investigate the role of fundamentals as drivers of price momentum, we construct two sets of earnings momentum portfolio. The first earnings momentum portfolio is constructed based on the past dividend paid by the firm relative to its market cap. The portfolio buys stocks of the highest dividend-paying firms over a 12 to 2 months formation period, and shorts the stocks of the lowest ones. We find strong evidence that our dividend momentum (DIV) strategy is pro fitable across our sample: it yields a 5% average annual return with a standard deviation of 12%.

The second earnings momentum portfolio is constructed based on the dividend innovations. Speci cally, we look at the change of dividend year to year, and construct the DIV portfolio. The portfolio buys stocks with the highest change in dividend paid and shorts the stocks with the lowest ones. The DIV portfolio yield an over 24% return with a standard deviation of only 13.2%.

To discern whether price momentum seems driven by dividend momentum, we also test whether the alpha of the static UMD portfolio remains signi ficant and positive after we control for the Fama-French three factors plus the dividend momentum portfolio. In the EW sample, price momentum delivers excess returns of about 8.8% after controlling for the Fama-French three factors, signifi cant at the 1%. However, introducing DIV momentum reduces the alpha to 2.9%, and the alpha is insigni ficantly di fferent from zero. As for VW portfolios, they deliver higher alphas but are less precisely estimated. In this case, the annualized alpha of price momentum drops by half from 11.2% to 5.8% after controlling for DIV momentum.

Momentum crashes. We find that the distribution of monthly momentum returns is left skewed and displays excess kurtosis. Within the five largest EW (VW) momentum crashes, investors lost 18% (26%) on average. The difference between the beta of the winners and that of the losers has been -2.4 (-3.5), on average, and the losses stemmed mostly from the performance of the losers, which averaged at 24% (21%) monthly return. We find little action in the winners portfolio, which returned on average 2% (-6%).

Predictability and dynamic hedging. Dynamic hedging consists in levering the portfolio when its realized volatility has been low and/or the market has been under-performing, and de-levering otherwise. We begin our analysis by looking at whether set of variables helps predicting momentum returns in our sample, and we find that it does not. Probably, this is because the crashes in our sample are more heterogeneous both in terms of origins and in terms of length. In particular, they do not necessarily occur when the market rebounds after a long downturn, and they tend to last for shorter periods of time. As a consequence, our out-of-sample test of the dynamic hedged UMD strategy shows that either it underperforms static momentum, or it does not improve its returns.

"


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Transaction Costs of Factor Strategies

25.May 2019

A very important research papers related to all equity factor strategies …

Authors: Li, Chow, Pickard, Garg

Title: Transaction Costs of Factor Investing Strategies

Link: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3359947

Abstract:

Although hidden, implicit market impact costs of factor investing strategies may substantially erode the strategies' expected excess returns. The authors explain these market impacts costs and model them using rebalancing data of a suite of large and longstanding factor investing indices. They introduce a framework to assess the costs of rebalancing activities, and attribute these costs to characteristics such as rate of turnover and the concentration of turnover, which intuitively describe the strategies' demands on liquidity. The authors evaluate a number of popular factor-investing strategy implementations and identify how index construction methods, when thoughtfully designed, can reduce market impact costs.

Notable quotations from the academic research paper:

"Factor investing strategies have become increasingly popular. According to data from Morningstar Direct, assets under management (AUM) in factor investing ETFs and mutual funds across global markets increased from just below US$75 billion in 2005 to more than US$800 billion by the end of 2016.

In practice, when a provider rebalances an index, most managers tracking it execute the necessary transactions near the close of the rebalancing day in order to minimize their portfolio’s tracking error. The fund managers may appear to be perfectly tracking the index; in another words, minimizing implementation shortfall, which is the aggregate difference between the average traded price and the closing price of each of the index's underlying securities on the rebalancing day. Thus, the total implementation cost of an index fund could be perceived as merely the sum of the explicit costs associated with trading, such as commissions, taxes, ticker charges, and so forth. This notion misses the propagating market impact that trading has on the index’s value. The large volume of buy and sell orders for the same securities, executed at the same time, can result in securities prices moving against the managers, producing losses for both the index and the fund investors. This implicit cost is often overlooked because it is not visible when comparing a fund’s net asset value (NAV) and the index’s value; it can, however, be overwhelmingly large relative to the explicit costs for strategies with massive AUM. This article focuses on unmasking the market impact costs that arise from synchronous buying and selling.

We analyze the behavior of stocks that were traded during the rebalancing of 49 FTSE RAFI™ Indices (henceforth, “the indices”). We find significant evidence of market impact on the rebalancing day and a subsequent price reversal over the next four days. We find that the magnitude of price impact is predictable, because it is directly related to the security’s liquidity and the size of the trade.

Specifically, we identify that a fund incurs approximately 30 basis points (bps) of trading costs due to market impact for every 10% of a stock’s average daily volume (ADV) traded in aggregate by the factor investing index–tracking funds.

Market Impact

Our simple relationship of market impact versus the security’s liquidity and the size of the trade can be used to estimate the implicit transaction costs of rebalancing trades. We apply our model and evaluate the costs of an extended list of popular strategies with various turnover rates, trade sizes, levels of security liquidity, and number of rebalances. We find that, at a modest level of AUM, and assuming all rebalancing trades occur near the end of
the rebalancing date, the expected transaction costs can significantly erode the expected alpha as indicated by long-term historical backtests. Specifically, with as little as $10 billion in AUM, momentum indexing strategies can have trading costs of 200 bps or more. At the same level of assets, income strategies’ costs are in the 60–80 bps range, and quality strategies’ costs fall below 40 bps. We report the capacities, defined as AUM when expected costs reach a high and fixed level (50 bps a year), of these strategies. We also present an attribution model to relate costs to strategy characteristics and explain in detail how certain styles of investing—for instance, those that trade frequently and those that trade completely in and out of a few illiquid positions—require higher costs than others.

Liquidity characteristics

"


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The Impact of Crowding on Alternative Risk Premiums

17.May 2019

Related to all factor strategies …

Author: Baltas

Title: The Impact of Crowding in Alternative Risk Premia Investing

Link: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3360350

Abstract:

Crowding is a major concern for investors in the alternative risk premia space. By focusing on the distinct mechanics of various systematic strategies, we contribute to the discussion with a framework that provides insights on the implications of crowding on subsequent strategy performance. Understanding such implications is key for strategy design, portfolio construction, and performance assessment. Our analysis shows that divergence premia, like momentum, are more likely to underperform following crowded periods. Conversely, convergence premia, like value, show signs of outperformance as they transition into phases of larger investor flows.

Notable quotations from the academic research paper:

"Crowding risk is listed as one of the most important impediments for investing in alternative risk premia. We contribute to this industry debate by exploring the mechanics of the various ARP in the event of investor flows, and study the implications of crowdedness on subsequent performance.

The cornerstone of our methodology is the classification of the ARP strategies into divergence and convergence premia. Divergence premia, like momentum, lack a fundamental anchor and inherently embed a self-reinforcing mechanism (e.g. in momentum, buying outperforming assets, and selling underperforming ones). This lack of a fundamental anchor creates the coordination problem that Stein (2009) describes, which can ultimately have a destabilising effect.

Divergence factor

Conversely, convergence premia, like value, embed a natural anchor (e.g. the valuation spread between undervalued and overvalued assets) that acts as an self-correction mechanism (as undervalued assets are no longer undervalued if overbought). Extending Stein’s (2009) views, such dynamics suggest that investor flows are actually likely to have a stabilising effect for convergence premia.

Convergence premia

In order to test these hypotheses we use the pairwise correlation of factor-adjusted returns of assets in the same peer group (outperforming assets, undervalued assets and so on so forth) as a metric for crowding.

We provide empirical evidence in line with these hypotheses. Divergence premia within equity, commodity and currency markets are more likely to underperform following crowded periods.

All divergence premias

Whereas convergence premia show signs of outperformance as they transition into phases of higher investor flows.

All convergence premias"


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Momentum In International Government Bonds Can Be Explained By Currency Momentum

18.April 2019

A new academic paper related to:

#8 – Currency Momentum Factor

Authors: Zaremba, Kambouris

Title: The Sources of Momentum in International Government Bond Returns

Link: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3332942

Abstract:

This study aims to offer a new explanation for the momentum effect in international government bonds. Using cross-sectional and time-series tests, we examine a sample of bonds from 22 countries for the years 1980 through 2018. We document significant momentum profits that are not attributable to bond-specific risk factors, such as volatility or credit risk. The global bond momentum is driven by the returns on underlying foreign exchange rates. Controlling for currency movements fully explains the abnormal returns on momentum strategies in international government bonds. The results are robust to many considerations including alternative sorting periods, portfolio construction methods, as well as subperiod and subsample analysis.

Notable quotations from the academic research paper:

"The various types of momentum effects have also been documented in government bonds, implying that the fixed-income winners outperform fixed-income losers. Although the finance literature extensively discusses the sources of momentum in an equity universe, the specific explanations for momentum in government bonds are rather scarce.

This paper aims to contribute in two ways. First, we provide new evidence on the momentum effect in international government bond markets. Using cross-sectional and time-series tests, we investigate a sample of government bonds from 22 countries for the years 1980 through 2018.

Second, and more importantly, we offer and test two new explanations of momentum. Our first hypothesis builds on Conrad and Kaul (1998): we conjecture that the momentum in bonds may simply capture the cross-sectional variation in long-run returns. In other words, the top performing assets continue to deliver higher returns because they exhibit excessive risk exposure. In particular, we assume that the winner (loser) bonds may display high (low) exposure to duration and credit risks, which drive the excessive long-run returns. The second hypothesis is that the momentum in bonds might be driven by the returns on underlying currencies.

Fund flows

The primary findings of this study can be summarized as follows. We document a strong and robust momentum effect in government bonds. An equal-weighted portfolio of past winners tends to outperform past losers by 0.24–0.35% per month. The effect is not fully attributable to the risk factors in government bonds, which explain 38–55% of the abnormal profits. Nevertheless, the phenomenon is entirely explained by the momentum in underlying foreign exchange rates, which is consistent with our second hypothesis. Once we control for the currency returns in cross-section or time-series tests, the momentum alphas disappear. The results are robust to many considerations, including alternative sorting periods and portfolio implementation methods, as well as subperiod and subsample analyses."


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Three Insights from Academic Research Related to Momentum Strategy

4.April 2019

What are the main insights?

– momentum is not an anomaly in a risk-based asset pricing framework. Riskier assets tend to be in the loser portfolios after (large) increases in the price of risk. The risk of momentum portfolios usually decreases with the prevailing price of risk, and their risk premiums are approximately negative quadratic functions of the price of risk (and the market premium) theoretically truncated at zero.

– changes to market liquidity adds to the explanation of momentum crashes along with the market rebounds, this relationship is driven by the asymmetric large return sensitivity of short-leg of momentum portfolio to changes in market liquidity that flares the tail risk of momentum strategy in panic states

– momentum returns are highly related to market risk arising from return dispersion (RD) as momentum risk loadings and RD risk loadings are similarly priced in momentum portfolios

1/

Author: Souza

Title: A Critique of Momentum Anomalies

Link: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3341275

Abstract:

This paper offers theoretical, empirical, and simulated evidence that momentum regularities in asset prices are not anomalies. Within a general, frictionless, rational expectations, risk-based asset pricing framework, riskier assets tend to be in the loser portfolios after (large) increases in the price of risk. Hence, the risk of momentum portfolios usually decreases with the prevailing price of risk, and their risk premiums are approximately negative quadratic functions of the price of risk (and the market premium) theoretically truncated at zero. The best linear (CAPM) function describing this relation unconditionally has exactly the negative slope and positive intercept documented empirically.

2/

Authors: Butt, Virk

Title: Momentum Crashes and Variations to Market Liquidity

Link: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3314095

Abstract:

We document that the variation in market liquidity is an important determinant of momentum crashes that is independent of other known explanations surfaced on this topic. This relationship is driven by the asymmetric large return sensitivity of short-leg of momentum portfolio to changes in market liquidity that flares the tail risk of momentum strategy in panic states. This identification explains the forecasting ability of known predictors of tail risk of momentum strategy such that the contemporaneous increase in market liquidity predominantly sums up the trademark negative relationship between predictors and future momentum returns. Our results are robust using a different momentum portfolio and alternative measures of market liquidity that make a substantial part of the common source of variation in aggregate liquidity.

3/

Authors: Kolari, Liu

Title: Market Risk and the Momentum Mystery

Link: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3280559

Abstract:

This paper employs the ZCAPM asset pricing model of Liu, Kolari, and Huang (2018) to show that momentum returns are highly related to market risk arising from return dispersion (RD). Cross-sectional tests show that momentum risk loadings and RD risk loadings are similarly priced in momentum portfolios. Comparative analyses find that zero-investment momentum portfolios and zero-investment return dispersion portfolios earn high returns relative to other risk factors. Further regression tests indicate that zero-investment momentum returns are very significantly related to zero-investment return dispersion returns. We conclude that the momentum mystery is explained by market risk associated with return dispersion for the most part.


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Two Centuries of Global Factor Premiums

7.March 2019

Related to all major factor strategies (trend, momentum, value, carry, seasonality and low beta/volatility):

Authors: Baltussen, Swinkels, van Vliet

Title: Global Factor Premiums

Link: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3325720

Abstract:

We examine 24 global factor premiums across the main asset classes via replication and new-sample evidence spanning more than 200 years of data. Replication yields ambiguous evidence within a unified testing framework with methods that account for p-hacking. The new-sample evidence reveals that the large majority of global factors are strongly present under conservative p-hacking perspectives, with limited out-of-sample decay of the premiums. Further, utilizing our deep sample, we find global factor premiums to be not driven by market, downside, or macroeconomic risks. These results reveal strong global factor premiums that present a challenge to asset pricing theories.

Notable quotations from the academic research paper:

"In this paper we study global factors premiums over a long and wide sample spanning the recent 217 years across equity index (but not single securities), bond, currency, and commodity markets.

The first objective of this study is to robustly and rigorously examine these global factor premiums from the perspective of ‘p-hacking’.

We take as our starting point the main global return factors published in the Journal of Finance and the Journal of Financial Economics during the period 2012-2018: time-series momentum (henceforth ‘trend’), cross-sectional momentum (henceforth ‘momentum’), value, carry, return seasonality and betting-against-beta (henceforth ‘BAB’). We examine these global factors in four major asset classes: equity indices, government bonds, commodities and currencies, hence resulting in a total of 24 global return factors.4

We work from the idea that these published factor premiums could be influenced by p-hacking and that an extended sample period is useful for falsification or verification tests. Figure 1, Panel A summarizes the main results of these studies.

Global factor strategies

Shown are the reported Sharpe ratio’s in previous publications, as well as the 5% significance cutoff in the grey-colored dashed line. In general, the studies show evidence on the global factor premiums, with 14 of the 22 factors (return seasonality is not tested in bonds and currencies) displaying significant Sharpe ratio’s at the conventional 5% significance level.

Global factor strategies 1981-20111

Further, most of the studies have differences in, amongst others, testing methodologies, investment universes and sample periods, choices that introduce degrees of freedom to the researcher. To mitigate the impact of such degrees of freedom, we reexamine the global return factors using uniform choices on testing methodology and investment universe over their average sample period (1981-2011). Figure 1, Panel B shows the results of this replicating exercise. We find that Sharpe ratios are marginally lower, with 12 of the 24 factor premiums being significant at the conventional 5% level.

Global factor strategies 1981-2011


The second objective of this study is to provide rigorous new sample evidence on the global return factors. To this end, we construct a deep, largely uncovered historical global database on the global return factors in the four major asset classes. This data consists of pre-sample data spanning the period 1800- 1980, supplemented with post-sample data from 2012-2016, such that we have an extensive new sample to conduct further analyses. If the global return factors were unintentionally the result of p-hacking, we would expect them to disappear for this new sample period.

Our new sample findings reveal consistent and ubiquitous evidence for the large majority of global return factors. Figure 1, Panel C summarizes our main findings by depicting the historical Sharpe ratio’s in the new sample period. In terms of economic significance, the Sharpe ratios are substantial, with an average of 0.41. Remarkably, in contrast to most out-of-sample studies we see very limited ‘out-of-sample’ decay of factor premiums.

In terms of statistical significance and p-hacking perspectives, 19 of the 24 t-values are above 3.0,19 Bayesian p-values are below 5%, and the break-even prior odds generally need to be above 9,999 to have less than 5% probability that the null hypothesis is true."


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